results for
Sharp, Gene

  • 198 Methods of Nonviolent Action

    2 pages

    1973

    The Albert Einstein institution released Gene Sharpe’s non-exhaustive list of methods of nonviolent actions. The Institution believes that far too often people struggling for democratic rights and justice are not aware of the full range of methods of nonviolent action. Wise strategy, attention to the dynamics of nonviolent struggle, and careful selection of methods can increase a group’s chances of success.

    Handout

  • Accion Directa No Violenta

    8 pages

    Spanish-language explanation of nonviolent direct action, list of nonviolent methods, and a related worksheet

    Handout

  • Annotated Bibliography on Training For Non-Violent Action and Civilian-Based Defence

    5 pages

    1981

    Annotated bibliography of 4 books on training for nonviolent action and civilian-based defense.

    Bibliography

  • Correcting Common Misconceptions about Nonviolent Action

    1 pages

    1973

    Shape addresses misconceptions surrounding what nonviolence action truly is in the world. The Albert Einstein Institution utilized Shape’s succinct explanation in a. Informational handout. In the plainest of words from Shape nonviolent action is not passive. It is not inaction. It is action that is nonviolent.

    Handout

  • How Nonviolent Struggle Works

    1 pages

    Brief explanation of how nonviolent struggle works based on the theory of Gene Sharp. Nonviolent struggle works by undermining the opponent's power at its source. A government's political power, for example, ultimately depends on the consent and cooperation of its citizens. Rulers of governments and political systems are not omnipotent, nor do they possess self generating power. On the contrary, all dominating elites and rulers depend for their sources of power upon the cooperation of the population and of the institutions of the society they would rule. If the population rejects the rulers' right to rule and to command, they are withdrawing the general agreement, or group consent, which makes the existing government possible. This loss of authority sets in motion the disintegration of the rulers' power. That power is reduced to the degree that the rulers are denied authority. Where the loss is extreme, the existence of that particular government is threatened.

    Handout

  • National Defense Without Armaments

    13 pages

    1970

    Overview of civilian-based defense.

    Article

  • Nonviolent Resistance and National Defense

    1 pages

    List of 10 points about civilian-based national defense.

    Handout

  • Power

    1 pages

    1973

    Figure illustrating dynamics of power.

    Handout

  • Six Classes of Action in Conflicts

    1 pages

    1973

    Figure illustrating a typology of classes of action in conflicts.

    Handout

  • The Political Equivalent of War-- Civilian-based Defense

    33 pages

    1980

    Overview of civilian-based defense.

    Article

  • Transitions to Civilian-Based Defense

    4 pages

    1990

    Presentation on civilian-based defense.

    Article